What do you understand by the term blended learning? (a poll)

I’m hearing the term “blended learning” used to mean a number of different things nowadays? Which is closest to your own definition – or do you have another to share? I’ll report on the final results in another post.

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Jane Hart

Founder at C4LPT
Jane Hart is an independent workplace learning advisor, writer and international speaker, and is the Founder of the Centre for Learning & Performance Technologies. She focuses on helping organisations with Modern Workplace Learning and individuals with Modern Professional Learning workshops. Find out more about Jane at JaneHart.com.

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36 thoughts on “What do you understand by the term blended learning? (a poll)

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  4. ellenschuurink

    The poll itself shows that the definition is changing. Where the original / traditional term combines online with face-to-face learning, the world is now full of different interventions. For example the virtual classroom, this is a combination of online and face-to-face, but the intervention on it’s own, I would not call blended. For me the wide variety of interventions and the right mix makes a good learning program, which is many cases results in a blended program 🙂

  5. Adam Creelman

    Technically, in the Ed Tech field, it entails a blend of online and face-to-face approaches. A lot of research has been done on this blending of mediums (and more importantly the instructional strategies that tend to go along with them), with some significant effect sizes emerging.

    I learned recently that in the corporate world, a new definition seems to have been concocted, where blended learning refers to a movement away from traditional/formal training, towards a more ‘blended’ approach that emphasizes authentic practice and other, more social-constructivist, strategies.

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