Towards the Connected L&D Department

In my previous post I shared a chart I have been using to demonstrate what it means for the L&D function to move  from a “packaging” role to one that helps to support and “scaffold” learning in the flow of daily work.  I have had a few questions asking how other organisations are moving forward in these areas, so in this (revised) chart below I have colour-coded the areas to show the different type of activity I am seeing.

cld

Firstly, the red area is the traditional L&D operating area – designing, delivering and managing instruction (ie face-to-face training and e-learning)

The orange area is where I am now seeing quite  a lot of interest and activity; that is expanding the traditional L&D area into “packaging” performance support, and also moving into more “scaffolded”  and social approaches to formal learning, and also examples of self-service professional learning portals for on-demand access to a range of opportunities.

The blue area is the new area of “social collaboration”, where a number of forward-thinking L&D departments are already playing a major role. Here they are working in partnership with teams and groups to help them share knowledge, experience and resources as a natural part and process of their daily work. Some are also helping to build the new personal and social skills to help their people become effective Connected Workers.

I am often asked why L&D departments should become involved in this new blue area. There are many good reasons for this. There’s the fact that working is changing, and that organizational learning needs to change too. But this blue area is where the “real” learning takes place in the workplace – in the workflow informally and  socially. Up to recently, L&D hasn’t been able to support this type of learning in any easy way, but now there are huge opportunities to make a significant impact on the business, and in doing so measure the success of initiatives and efforts in meaningful terms like performance improvements and behavioural changes.

And what is the cost of not getting involved? Well, this blue area is ripe for the picking, so if L&D doesn’t get involved, others will do so – whether it be IT, Business Ops, or something else. But what’s more as face-to-face training goes out of fashion, and e-learning is outsourced – as is happening to Training Depts on a regular basis now – then it avoids the risk of the L&D team being shut down.  A Connected L&D Dept will have a significantly enhanced role in the organisation and will become an indispensable function.

So how do you get started? Well, this blue area of work requires a very different mindset and approach from the traditional L&D role. It also requires a set of new capabilities and skills. And it involves using and supporting a range of new social technologies rather than dedicated “learning technologies”.

Harold Jarche and I have been advising organisations as well as leading open sessions on this for a number of years now, and we are about to offer a range of new and updated activities and workshops, which we will announce here shortly.  But in the meantime, if you want to find out more about what it involves , take a look at our Connected Worker site and in particular our Connected L&D Department initiative.

Other posts in this series

1 - The changing role of L&D: from “packaging” to “scaffolding” plus “social capability building”

3 - Instructional design: from “packaging” to “scaffolding”

4 - Supporting self-managed team learning in the organisation

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Jane Hart

Founder at C4LPT
Jane Hart is an independent Workplace Learning Advisor, Writer and International Speaker. Every year she compiles the Top 100 Tools for Learning activity. She also offer a number of online workshops on modernising workplace learning. Find out more about Jane and her work.

19 thoughts on “Towards the Connected L&D Department

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  8. Ara ohanian (@aohanian)

    Jane, I really like this approach not least because it shows that development in L&D is not a matter of either/or. L&D needs to broaden its activity. I also like your warning about the dangers of not moving into the blue areas. You are 100% right when you say if L&D doesn’t do it – others will. In particular, I know of many organizations where enlightened sales marketing and operational people are using L&D tools to achieve goals that the L&D dept itself seems unaware of. This is an opportunity for us in L&D and we should recognize that make the most of it.

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  13. David Salusbury

    Interesting–if I could only read what is in the chart!

    The idea of scaffolding–as opposed to a tidy package–is in sync with the new view of Change “Management”: this is no longer neat and linear, as it once was. David Snowdon’s Cynefin (“koonervoon”) model is worth correlating with this interesting approach.

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